Monday, December 03, 2007

It is a kind of emotional roller-coaster I have never experienced before

However, it was only a few months ago that Rakhee became Aurovilian. “I didn't mean to delay it this long. I felt like I was an Aurovilian the first day I came here. But I wanted to take my time; I didn't want to become Aurovilian just because my partner was.”
What have Rakhee's challenges been along the way? “Loneliness. Initially with few friends I felt very alone. But when my daughter arrived it became better as I was so busy. However this feeling of being alone still hits sometimes – even though I now have plenty of friends and work in the studio.
“What I have noticed in Auroville is that if you are not occupied in doing some kind of work you can quickly get very frustrated. And here one can have the highest ‘highs' and lowest ‘lows' in very quick succession. It is a kind of emotional roller-coaster I have never experienced before.”
“That we may not have ‘material generosity' is fine, but do we as a community have openness?” asks Rakhee, a potter who has been living in Auroville for the past seven years. “Openness to let people experience Auroville in the way they want to?”
Priya Sundaravalli Home > Journals & Media > Journals > Auroville Today > As a community, we need more openness Current issue Archive copies The Auroville Experience

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